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2004 Competition Results

June 10, 2016

Back to competition

Final National Ranking

Updated Nov 27, 2004 

Rank Pilot Name National Points Paratoys Salton Parastars Fly-By Am Flyer ABQ Nationals Fly-By 1st Hi Value 2nd Hi Value
1 Jeff Goin 1554 894 553 500 660 894 660
2 Eric Dufour 1450 0 750 377 700 750 700
3 Bob Ryan 1239 864 0 375 0 864 375
4 Marty Hathaway 1120 0 516 0 604 604 516
5 Richard Good 1114 0 605 0 509 605 509
6 Arnon Lufi 1000 1000 0 0 0 1000 0
7 Mike Ralph 919 0 327 0 592 592 327
8 Andy McAvin 820 556 0 0 264 556 264
9 Dell Schanze 793 793 0 0 0 793 0
9 Nick Scholtes 793 793 0 0 0 793 0
10 Mike Masterson 756 756 0 0 0 756 0
11 Eric Steele 754 754 0 0 0 754 0
12 Bill Heaner 700 700 0 0 0 700 0
13 Phil Russman 688 460 228 0 0 460 228
14 Francesco Desantis 671 671 0 0 0 671 0
15 Paul Bailey 630 0 630 0 0 630 0
16 Abe Christenson 616 616 0 0 0 616 0
17 Terry Latimer 516 0 0 0 516 516 0
18 Alan Chuculate 513 513 0 0 0 513 0
19 Mo Sheldon 471 471 0 0 0 471 0
20 Dan Kriseler 455 0 455 0 0 455 0
21 Ron Hultin 405 0 405 0 0 405 0
22 James Coblentz 393 0 393 0 0 393 0
23 Mike McGuirk 392 0 0 392 0 392 0
24 Stanley Kasica 372 0 0 0 372 372 0
25 Casey Cadwell 282 282 0 0 0 282 0
26 Tim Kaiser 195 0 0 195 0 195 0
27 Dave Rogers 157 0 0 0 493 493 0

Fall Fly-By (Ocala, FL)

Nov 19-20, 2004.

Round 1

Pilot Name Takeoff Spot Landing Touch and Go Bomb Drop Cloverleaf Kiting War Foot Drag Slow
/Fast
Session 1 Total
Eric Dufour 300 450 350 65 350 400 190 2105
Jeff Goin 300 258 350 74 344 110* 381 200 2017
Marty Hathaway 300 97 350 130 284 357 162 1680
Mike Ralph 300 350 275 35 396 143 1499
Terry Latimer 300 204 195 94 326 363 138 1620
Richard Good 300 145 275 200 328 280 68 1596
Stanley Kasica 300 31 0 30 259 313 117 1050
Dave Rogers 300 0 143 50 0 493
Andy McAvin 300 0 0 300

Round 2

Pilot Name Takeoff Spot Landing Touch and Go Bomb Drop Cloverleaf Kiting War Foot Drag Slow
/Fast
Session 1 Total
Eric Dufour 300 449 275 134 350 110* 378 200 2196
Jeff Goin 300 350 350 150 335 60* 358 167 2070
Marty Hathaway 300 370 350 104 300 331 139 1894
Mike Ralph 300 214 350 114 335 400 144 1857
Richard Good 200 320 275 30 323 325 56 1529
Terry Latimer 300 19 350 50 326 392 47 1484
Stanley Kasica 300 102 70 61 250 347 37 1167
Andy McAvin 203 0 128 298 200 0 829
Dave Rogers Did Not Compete This Round

*Kiting war requires a pilot to keep his wing up for 2 minutes in order to earn any points.

Fly By Final Standings

Place Pilot Motor Wing Points
1 Eric Dufour Paratour SD 100, Fresh Breeze Silex, Small 2,196
2 Jeff Goin Paralite Sky Cruiser Snap 100 Fresh Breeze Silex, Small 2,070
3 Marty Hathaway Paratour SD 100 Turbo 1,894
4 Mike Ralph Paratour SD 100 Turbo 1,857
5 Terry Latimer Adventure R3 Adventure Speedoo 1,620
6 Richard Good Paratour SD 100 Gin Gangsta 1,596
7 Stanley Kasica Paratour SD 100 ? 1,167
8 Andy McAvin Paralite Sky Cruiser 100, Muse MacPara Muse    829
9 Dave Rogers Fly Products Powerjet Top 80 Apco Thrust    493

 

American Flyer (Albuquerque, NM)

Oct 3, 2004.

Rank Pilot Name/
Equipement
Wing/Motor Takeoff Spot Landing Touch and Go Bomb Drop Cloverleaf Foot Drag Slow/
Fast
Score
1 Jeff Goin Silex
SC Snap 100
200 0 350 0 500 220 225 1495
2 Mike McGuirk MacPara Eden
SD Simonini
300  DQ 175 127 400 0 171 1173
3 Eric Dufour EZ Glider
SD RDM
300 236 290 0  DQ 0 300 1126
4 Bob Ryan Sigma 5
SC Black Devil
300 375 250 92 DNC 105 0 1122
5 Tim Kaiser FB Silex
SC Top 80
300  DQ 120 0  DNC  DNC 164 584

Parastars (Fly-By Ranch)

Apr 7,8 2004; revised Apr 15, 2004.

Pilots Kiting Foot drag Efficiency Slow/
Fast
Takeoff Pwr Off Land Bomb Drop Touch & Go Thur Culum Wed Cumul Highest Cumul % of highest score Natl Points Plc
Eric Dufour 110 169 159 215 300 231 100 330 1615 1828 1828 100.00% 750 1
Paul Bailey 10 90 120 300 300 350 15 350 1535 1327 1535 83.98% 630 2
Richard Good 0 0 367 216 300 290 26 275 1474 1453 1474 80.66% 605 3
Jeff Goin 35 0 93 246 300 367 59 250 1349 1182 1349 73.82% 554 4
Marty Hathaway 0 150 0 203 300 156 100 350 1258 1206 1258 68.86% 516 5
Dan Kriseler 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 60 1108 1108 60.64% 455 6
Ron Hultin 0 70 32 0 300 162 93 330 987 858 987 53.99% 405 7
James Coblentz 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 957 957 52.38% 393 8
Mike Ralph 10 167 0 0 300 0 66 255 798 790 798 43.64% 327 9
Phil Russman 10 0 0 0 400 0 0 0 410 556 556 30.42% 228 10
MinPilots: 5, MaxPilots: 15, competitors: 10,
Competition Worth: 750
Highest Score: 1828 1828

 

Paratoys 2004

Feb 7, 2004

Pilots # Foot drag Takeoff Pwr Off Landing Bomb Drop Kicking Sticks (Slalom) Touch & Go Cumul % of highest score National Points place
Arnon Lufi 2 355 300 370 134 550 350 2058 100.00% 1000 1
Jeff Goin 1 272 300 375 78 540 275 1840 89.40% 894 2
Bob Ryan 9 350 280 156 106 535 350 1777 86.36% 864 3
Nick Scholtes 7 345 300 151 DQ 486 350 1633 79.32% 793 4
Dell Schanze 4 345 300 DQ 149 488 350 1631 79.27% 793 5
Mike Masterson 8 150 300 368 DQ 464 275 1557 75.63% 756 6
Eric Steele 11 297 300 0 146 460 350 1552 75.41% 754 7
Bill Heaner 15 353 300 DQ DQ 438 350 1441 70.00% 700 8
Francesco Desantis 12 0 300 234 111 481 255 1382 67.12% 671 9
Abe Christenson 10 218 180 97 74 522 175 1267 61.55% 616 10
Andy McAvin 5 0 300 169 DQ 400 275 1144 55.60% 556 11
Alan Chuculate 3 0 0 236 DQ 509 310 1055 51.27% 513 12
Mo Sheldon 6 250 180 0 DQ 410 130 970 47.12% 471 13
Phil Russman 13 380 60 DQ DQ 467 40 947 46.02% 460 14
Casey Cadwell 14 400 180 DNC DNC DNC 0 580 28.18% 282 15
Highest Score: 2058
MinPilots: 5 # of Competitors: 15
MaxPilots: 15 Competition Worth: 1000

2004 Standings Finalized

Nov 27, 2004

After five events spanning the entire country, the cumulative scores have been totalled. And the verdict is… (click here for National Standings.)

Finals Completed

Nov 21, 2004

The final USPPA competition for 2004 is behind us. Cooperative Florida weather gave contestants warm blues skies for two days of practicing and competing. On Sunday the pilots relaxed to a cross country about the surrounding area.

Congratulations to Eric Dufour who took the victory after two rounds, Jeff Goin garnered 2nd place and Marty Hathaway stepped up to 3rd.

It was a very enjoyable time for the 9 pilots who competed and built friendships even in the face of a strong desire to do well. The results are included under “National Rankings“.

Pictured Left is Terry Latimer, new to competition, who is stretching for a spot landing. Above right is the gold “Paramotor Man” Necklace, given to each of the top 3 winners.

Saturday afternoon included two rounds of the kiting war and, in spite of light conditions for much of it, both rounds had the necessary minimum kiting time (2 minutes) to count.

The National Standings will be updated shortly to reflect these scores. Schedules for the 2005 competitions have not been set but there will be one in April and another in November, again at Fly-By Ranch.

Here are just a few bits of the many memories captured in the brief time together.

  1. The Judges are recovering a a humorous moment.
    2. Marty Hathaway enjoys a Sunday cruise. Elisabeth is flying the trike beyond him.
    3. Eight of Nine competitors meet the camera, it was the shots that FOLLOWED these that were memorable. We’ll have those eventually!
    4. There is a free ride.

High Attitude, High Altitude

Oct 8, 2004
by Jeff Goin

Just launching from 5200′ above sea level is a challenge. Results are under National Rankings.

We had the requisite five competitors including a new pilot who had never flown one. Second place was earned by another new-to-competition pilot Mike McGuirk.

As with all these events it was fun just to get together with like-minded fellow flyers. And it’s always a learning curve. There will be two rule changes to make judging more objective. They are:

  1. The bomb drop minimum altitude will be dropped. You can come in as low as you want as long as nothing touches except the bomb. Where it stops determines your distance. So if it touches the cone and bounces off, that is still where it is measured from.
  2. The touch and go now has a maximum distance. Stepping outside of that distance zero’s the step score (but not the target portion of the score).

Petroleum To Airspeed:
The Ultralight Nationals Completes

Sept 24, 2004
by Jeff Goin

The scores are posted. Congratulations to David Sigier of Canada who earned the most total points and the victory.

Details are forthcoming but the order is David Sigier, Jeff Goin and Dave Rogers, a new pilot who came to Scottsburg with only 20 flights and a desire to learn. We’ve not heard the last of this up and coming pilot!

The last swoop of David Sigier’s “Japanese Slalom” ended two days of the most perfect weather served up to light fliers. Conditions were such that it was possible to fly all day on both days allowing completion of every planned task.

The last Task was quite the crowd pleaser – a low level course involving 4 sticks where contestants rounded corners and kicked sticks in precise fashion within feet of the ground.

We certainly both wanted to win but didn’t let that interfere with tank fulls of fun along the way. Returning from the “Outlanding” field we flew together and David hammed it up a bit with “Big Ears” as seen on the top picture.

A most unique task consumed the entire morning airborne. It involved getting maps, directions, a sealed envelope and orders to “fetch” certain turnpoints. Once identified, straight lines were drawn on the map (while in flight)  connecting the points. If done correctly, their intersection gives the new destination – where you should go land. An awaiting marshal recorded the landing time and took your map for scoring. It was like a road rally in the air. Afterward, pilots were free to fly back to the comp field or ride back in a vehicle. Of course we flew back.

A buffet style banquet and awards ceremony with live music completed the evening. Several awards were given by USUA’s Dale Hooper and Tom Gunnarson including one that went to PPG pilot David Rogers for flying accomplishment in his pre-ppg craft, a Quicksilver MX.

The amount of planning and time that went into this became apparent – it was enormous. And it was designed to make it fun for the pilots.

The people who made this happen gave unprecedented levels of participation including publicity and participation by the city of Scottsburg. It was very, very clear they wanted us there and made us (the PPG pilots) feel welcome in what has been primarily a fixed-wing event.

Any pilot that has enough skill to consistently launch and land can compete in these events. Most of the event does not include the low-level work that some fear and even what’s there can be flown up high just for practice. Next time we can hopefully have more participate – it is a LOT of work to organize and my hat is off to Tom Gunnarson of USUA and all the other folks who have made this possible.

Contestants were David Sigier (Top 80 Miniplane & Nervures Wing), Dave Rogers (Fly Products Top 80 Powerjet & Apco Thrust wing) and Jeff Goin (Top 80 Paralite Sky Cruiser with Silex wing).

Flying navigation tasks are fun – it’s like a rally, you’re given these incredibly accurate maps and instructed to “go fetch”. Flying within 500′ of the point scores a hit which will be read later by the scoring people through your GPS (sealed so you can’t read it).

National Geographic videotaped a feature on two ultralight pilots and was present for much of the proceedings. We plaud the USUA for going to the effort of putting this on.

Friday Day 2

  1. Dave Rogers and David Sigier get their gear ready on the launch “Deck”. Getting airborne proved challenging in the hot, humid conditions.
  2. After flying around and “S” shaped course and marking points for a line, I wound up missing one and had to revert to the “Secret Envelope” – it showed the destination to be this beautiful airport snuggled up to the Ohio River.
  3. Reading maps is a completely different skill than the low level maneuvering required for “flight precision”; but it is just another skill to master where getting there is indeed much of the fun.
  4. Epic Helmut Head.
  5. David Sigier shows up a few minutes after I did. He found all the points but drew the lines wrong and landed out. I was following my one line (in hopes to find the landing site) when I saw him land and circled down to see if that was the site (or if he had problems). He was fine and I figured this wasn’t the site so I climbed back up,  opened my “secret letter” and followed its directions to the outlanding site. He corrected his error and relaunched to head there himself.
  6. The Marshall, Rick, had driven to the airport to collect our maps and GPS’s.
  7. Larry Beckley, the nicest guy you’d ever want to meet. You’d like him even if he didn’t open up his beautiful airport for this insanity. He is also a commercial airplane pilot and ultralight instructor seen here by his trainer.
  8. We ate, the band played and –
  9. A few took the opportunity for fancy footwork.

  10. The banquet beckons. Many Chickens gave themselves up to the growth of human girth.
  11. Dale Hooper, USUA president played MC for most of the festivities and gave away a number of USUA awards.
  12. Tom Gunnarson, competition director, pulled himself away from scoring long enough to present a few awards himself.

 

Thursday Day 1


  1. A color guard marched to attention in the opening ceremony with a performance of the National Anthem and prayer. This was a very nice touch given what goes on around us and helps put the freedom we enjoy in perspective. It was moving.
  2. The three PPG contestants L to R: David Sigier with his brother Chris, Jeff Goin and David Rogers

  3. David Rogers returning from a navigation task.
  4. Jeff Goin reading the map.
  5. One of the waypoints turns out to be a “VOR” which is used by overflying jets. I hope this didn’t disturb their signal!
  6. Sunshine pours over a dewey blanket of ultralights parked on the flight line.

Wednesday 09/22/2004

 


  1. Pilots measure out each other’s fuel with Marshal’s supervision. The first task: take a limited amount of fuel on a triangle, do a touch and go on the “deck” then go hunt for other check points.
  2. The City of Scottsburg is providing a web cam atop this pole and Larry, the airport owner is providing wireless internet for pilots.
  1. David Rodgers, PPGer from the Tallahassee area, refuels his fly. All competition pilots are flying top 80 motors.
  2. We’re being nice to this group: the Marshals.

 

Big Win For Four

July 14, 2004

by Kevin Tayler

Four strokes that is. The relatively new Bailey 4-Stroke motor made a big competitive splash this year in Europe when Michel Carnet (four times British Paramotor Champion) and Paul Bailey, its creator took consecutive winning titles. Michel garnered the highest score in the French Nationals and then two weeks later was beaten into second place in the British Nationals by Paul Bailey. They were flying Bailey Aviation 4-Stroke motors and Paramania Action wings.

Pictured right is Paul Bailey, the 2004 British Champion.
Photo by Pascall Campbell Jones.

The British Championships, held in rural Norfolk, were concentrated into two days’ flying with 20 finishers (including two Belgium entrants). Bailey and Carnet were in a league of their own throughout and one or other was always going to take the title. Their strengths and weaknesses balance each other out and it was impossible to say who would gain the upper hand until the final scores were calculated. Paul Bailey is cool and determined, giving little away and always performing consistently, especially on those notorious forward launches in nil-wind or shifting-wind which he nailed every time. Michel, with more to lose, made some uncharacteristic launch and landing errors but was true to his free-flying background with a great thermalling task, airborne on two litres for an hour longer than most other pilots.

A complex low moved across the area, making it difficult to judge the weather. Conditions allowed two days of competitive flying, but not without drama. At a crucial moment in the middle of a fuel-economy task a huge cunim produced a rush of cold air and dragged the wind dramatically from SW to N, meaning that pilots who’d flown their into-wind legs at the beginning were also battling the wind on the way back, with the result that many landed out. On another occasion the whole field was laid out ready to launch into seemingly flat conditions to fly a 62km circuit when a deafening rumble of thunder and flashes of lightning ripped through the sky, directly upwind. Task aborted. Ten minutes later it deluged.

Competition Director Mike Campbell-Jones responded with some multi-tasking, an innovation in paramotoring which involves cramming as many challenges as possible into the same flight. We launched in pairs, raced flat-out for 10km, descended to ground level for measured fast/slow runs, moved over to the kicking-stick slalom, then powered up to 500 feet for a timed accuracy landing. In the evening we did the same thing all over again.

The best task was the ‘cat’s cradle’, a complex piece of navigation and route-planning on limited fuel. Numerous turnpoints were specified in different sectors and the trick was to fly the largest possible distance between points while optionally collecting bonus scores by returning to the field to kick a stick after every three strikes: all on 6 litres within a time window. This required detailed preparation as well as masterful flying and a thorough knowledge of one’s equipment, and it was notable that the two competition leaders planned and flew exactly the same route as each other (clearly the optimal one), without any cross-referring.

We are grateful to those who supported this year’s Nationals, including Sky Systems, the BMAA, FFPLUM, Bailey Aviation and Paramania.

Pos. Name

Wing

Engine

1. BAILEY Paul Paramania Action Bailey 4-stroke 150
2. CARNET Michel Paramania Action Bailey 4-stroke 150
3. PARKINSON Julian Paramania Action PAP Top 80 1400
4. CAMPBELL-JONES Pascal Paramania Action Vortex
5. GLASSE Henry Paramania Action Fly 115
6. HINZER Karl Hathor Symphony Bailey JPX 320
7. CREHAN Simon Paramania Action PAP Top 80 1300
8. KELLY Robbie Paramania Action Bailey JPX 320
9. CASTON John Paramania Action Bailey JPX 320
10. PUSHMAN Brian Hathor Legato DK Whisper GT
11. KEMP John Hathor Legato Bailey Solo 210
12. TAYLOR Kevin Paramania Action Fresh Breeze Airboss 122
13. KELLY Jansy Paramania Action PAP Top 80 1100
14. BEVERIDGE Brian Sky Lift DK Whisper GT
15. DENT Piers Silex Fresh Breeze Airboss 122
16. HALLATT Paul Paramania Action Fresh Breeze Airboss 122
17. KEENE Tom Paramania Action H&E Zyclone
18. HAIRS Dave Paramania Action Adventure F4
Guest Johan Bossuyt (BEL) Paramania Action PAP Top 80 1400 TD
Guest Stefaan Michils (BEL) Paramania Action PAP 1400 AS

First Dedicated Competition Completes

Fly-By Ranch, NW of Orlando, Florida

Photo at right by Bud Johnson – Competitors L to R Ron Hultin, Dan Kriseler, Paul Bailey, Mike Ralph, Jeff Goin, Marty Hathaway, Richard Good and Eric Dufour holding “Tiny”. Phil Russman, an excellent pilot, competed but slipped away from the photo (“I’m not gonna be in that thing after my performance!”)

This is the way to run a competition! Starting April 8th we flew two days of  very challenging conditions without as much as a broken propeller.

A new task has been added that mirrors the FAI’s “Slow/Fast”. This has you fly between to gates as slow as possible the first time and then as fast as possible the second time. Scoring favors the greatest DIFFERENCE between the two.

The event, held at Fly-By Ranch near Ocala, FL was a complete success. Ten pilots put their skills to the test, braving gusty Florida winds and thermals, and did an outstanding job. Unfortunately, high winds precluded running the “cloverleaf”, a high point task where the pilot kicks a center stick and flies around the four corners of the course.

Judging was excellent. With the practice day on Wednesday we were able to work out most bugs by both pilots and judges. Art Runzo was the Competition Director, David Friedrich the Lead judge and George Hawkins did the scoring. Four teams of judges watched over the tasks and kept impeccable records.

No mercy was shown to anyone as task DQ’s were handed out to all when the judges felt they were necessary. Preliminary scoring is complete thanks to George Hawkins. There were 10 excellent pilots flying in the very challenging conditions. Facilities at Fly-By make it easy to coordinate with a large briefing room at the edge of the field (far right Phil & Elisabeth let me interrupt).

The pictured judges formed their favored expression, “DQ”. George Hawkins, Christianne Moisan (CC), Art Runzo, David Friedrich, John Broda and Ed Chikitani made this the best judged event ever. CC earned her reputation as “Miss DQ” when Jeff Goin landed after a 4-second flight in the endurance competition due to a fuel line problem. She DQ’d his next effort since the rules have no allowance for a “second attempt”. Appropriate but still painful!

First Event

Our first competition is “in the bag”. Running of the tasks went very well at the Paratoys fly-in as each pilot got to fly his routine without significant waiting. There were no injuries and the most serious occurrence was related to a non-participant.

Due to the challenge of running these events during big fly-ins, they will be held primarily as as dedicated events with only very limited other flying allowed. This makes it safer for the competitors and non-competitors and improves the ability of judges and pilots to better acclimate to the rules.

Recent Changes

A new Pilot Reference has been added under “Rules”.

As the competition evolves the primary means to that evolution is through rules changes. The most recent revision attempts make it both safer and more fair.

One attempt to improve fairness changes the efficiency competition to reflect the innate ability of smaller motors to fly longer on less fuel. They will still confer some advantage but it will be greatly reduced. This scoring was applied to the Toledo competition and, as a result, a pilot flying a 184 cc motor tied with a pilot flying a 80 cc motor.

Kicking Sticks has been modified so that pilots have only one try but can kick either of the first two sticks to make their run count. Before this the pilot could have up to three tries but that caused pilots to be doing low altitude circles while other competitors had to overfly the task. This also makes it far easier to judge

 
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